Palindromes

Snog

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Palindromes are words or phrases that read the same backward and forward, letter for letter, number for number, or word for word.

Let's keep them to letter to letter or word for word.

I'll start with: A nut for a jar of tuna
 

Hollow Horse

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I don't think this is right. Examples of true palindromes would be (for example) civic, radar, tenet. So tuna wouldn't work.
 

Snog

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I don't think this is right. Examples of true palindromes would be (for example) civic, radar, tenet. So tuna wouldn't work.
I describe what a palindrome is in the first post. But, if you doubt it....

"A nut for a jar of tuna" reads the same forward or backwards. And is therefore a palindrome ;)
 

Hollow Horse

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Sorry. A true palindrome is as I explained and gave instances of. Tuna is simply a word that reads something else backwards, not a palindrome then. Here's a good one... "Hannah". As you have posted a link to Palindromes on Wikipedia you might want to read it correctly as you're contradicting yourself. I'm not arguing with you about it, it's simply how it is.
 

Snog

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Sorry. A true palindrome is as I explained and gave instances of. Tuna is simply a word that reads something else backwards, not a palindrome then. Here's a good one... "Hannah". As you have posted a link to Palindromes on Wikipedia you might want to read it correctly as you're contradicting yourself. I'm not arguing with you about it, it's simply how it is.
Where am I contradicting myself?
A palindrome is a word, number, phrase, or other sequence of characters which reads the same backward as forward, such as madam or racecar or the number 10801. Sentence-length palindromes may be written when allowances are made for adjustments to capital letters, punctuation, and word dividers, such as "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!", "Was it a car or a cat I saw?" or "No 'x' in Nixon".
Reading "A nut for a jar of tuna" backwards would be "anut fo raj a rof tun A" or making adjustments for word dividers is "a nut for a jar of tunA".
 

Snog

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Palindromes,



Not a palindrome. Let's see how long they take to finally graps this. Because I got better things to be getting on with. :LOL:
You are correct.

The single words "madam" and "racecar" are palindromes.

But so are phrases that read the same backwards or forwards. Palindromes are not restricted to single words. That's where you're making your mistake. ;)
 

Snog

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I know I am. Now you should carry on with your game.
I'm not sure what you're getting at. Or how the phrase you quoted a single word out of applies when the whole phrase is a palindrome, not the single word.

If you're under the impression that a palindrome is only single words, that's incorrect.

If you're saying each word in a phrase must be a palindrome in and of itself, that's also incorrect.
Sentences and phrases
Palindromes often consist of a sentence or phrase, e.g., "Mr. Owl ate my metal worm", "Was it a car or a cat I saw?", "Murder for a jar of red rum" or "Go hang a salami, I'm a lasagna hog". Punctuation, capitalization, and spaces are usually ignored. Some, such as "Rats live on no evil star", "Live on time, emit no evil", and "Step on no pets", include the spaces.
 
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