Computer and Solid-state drive

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DaveM

I recently upgraded my PC as I mentioned in this thread Computer specs. This is the first time I have had a SSD installed on any of my computers and the difference is stunning compared to the normal HD.

The difference really became apparent when I needed to recover data off my old HD and needed to boot from it. I installed the old drive as a second drive booted from it. I could not believe how long it took to boot-up on the same computer. Then when I opened outlook it also took some time to load where as on the SSD it is almost instantaneous.

So what exactly is a SSD and why does it work so much faster than the normal HD?

Like a memory stick, there are no moving parts to an SSD. Rather, information is stored in microchips. Conversely, a hard disk drive uses a mechanical arm with a read/write head to move around and read information from the right location on a storage platter. This difference is what makes SSD so much faster.

They still are rather pricey but it would be well worth you money to get a smaller capacity drive just to load your OS and application onto and have your data stored on a second normal HD
 

APS

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I did the same a while back,my OS is on SSD drive.If you blink during boot up you miss it :)
 

Snog

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Yep, the computer I'm on now has the OS on SSD and boots amazingly fast.

Our HTPC, and my file servers here all have SSDs in them for the OS.
 
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DaveM

I am starting to think I should have rather got a 1TB instead of the 500GB but the price get rather high as you go up in size and I was already far past what I wanted to spend on a PC.
 

Snog

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I am starting to think I should have rather got a 1TB instead of the 500GB but the price get rather high as you go up in size and I was already far past what I wanted to spend on a PC.
If you have that much on your OS/Program drive, then you have far too many programs. :D

If you're using the SSD as your OS, Program and Data drive, you're condemning the drive to an early death. :(
 

APS

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My SSD is 120Gb for OS only. My other drive is 1Tb partitioned into 2 for downloads and storage.
 

Snog

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Weren't they getting better at... not dying early deaths?
Yes, they are much better than they were say 5 years ago and will last a long time now.

But, I'm still a believer that the fewer writes to an SSD, the longer it will last.
 
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Daniel

Yes, they are much better than they were say 5 years ago and will last a long time now.

But, I'm still a believer that the fewer writes to an SSD, the longer it will last.
That's true, though I don't even see a need for a very large drive cause I store most of my files on Google Drive.

As to the original post, I could not possibly go back to using a mechanical drive as my boot drive...I would go absolutely mad. I already have to work on some computers that still have mechanical drives and it makes me realize how spoiled I am.
 

Ghoul

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I think it was about a year ago I opened up my 2011 iMac and stuck a SSD in there. Best decision ever. It was starting to get a bit slow and hanging at time and I knew there was nothing wrong with the machine the processor is an i7, 12GB of RAM so yeah.
 

Ghoul

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If you have that much on your OS/Program drive, then you have far too many programs. :D

If you're using the SSD as your OS, Program and Data drive, you're condemning the drive to an early death. :(
While SSDs do have a limited write cycled, I think you'd have to constantly be writing several GB of data straight for 3/4 years before it'd die. So for normal use you're going to easily get well over 5 at which point it's probably time for a new PC.
 

Snog

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So for normal use you're going to easily get well over 5 at which point it's probably time for a new PC.
Not necessarily true. I have a PC that I built in 2004 or 2005, all parts used are still available (and sold in new PCs) today. The only reason I retired it is I got the itch to build a new computer. But if I plugged it in, it would still run everything quite well. :D
 
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